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The Children’s Virtual Museum of Small Animals

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Apis mellifera

Bombus hortorum

Bombus lapidarius

Bombus lucorum

Bombus pascuorum

Bombus pratorum

Bombus terrestris

Xylocopa violacea



Andrena, Halictus scabiosae,Anthidium

Megachile pilidens, Ammophila campestris

Sceliphron caementarium

Trigonopsis


Andrenidae

Commonly known as mining bees, they are solitary and build their nest under the ground.

Halictidae

They are commonly referred to as "sweat bees" (especially the smaller species), as they are often attracted to perspiration.

Megachilidae

They are solitary bees, that carry pollen under their abdomen. According to the materials from which they build their nests, they are also known as mason bees, leafcutter bees, carder bees, resin bees.

Chrysidoidea  

It’s a super family, most species are small (7mm or less) parasitoids or parasites of other insects. In particular, for their colours, insects of family Chrysididae are called golden wasps.

Formicidae

Ants are social insects that evolved from vespoid wasp ancestors in the Cretaceous period. Their societies have division of labour, communication between individuals, and an ability to solve complex problems.

Scoliidae

They are very big, so they are called also mammoth wasps, Scoliidm as many among solitary Hymenoptera are “parasitoids”, as they lay their eggs in scarab beetle larvae.

Mutillidae

Their common name velvet ant refers to their dense pile of hair, bright scarlet. orange, black, white, silver, or gold. Their warning coloration is an aposematic signal, that’s to say they are not worth attacking or eating.

Regnum Animalia, Phylum Arthropoda, Subphylum Hexapoda, Classis Insecta

Ordo

HYMENOPTERA


From ancient Greek

humén = membrane + pteron = wing


complete metamorphosis


91 familiae, 200.000 species

Subordo

Apocrita


From ancient Greek apókritos = separated


Narrow "waist" between the first two segments of the abdomen

Apidae

The family includes honey bees, stingless bees (also used for honey production), bumblebees,  carpenter bees, orchid bees, cuckoo bees. They valuable pollinators in natural habitats and for agriculture.

Sphecidae

Those thread-waisted insects, though they are commonly called wasps (sand wasps, mud daubers) are part of the superfamilia Apoidea, that’s to say that from a scientific point of view they are more related to bees.

Chalcidoidea

Chalcidoids are generally tiny, less than 3 mm long, dark-coloured, black or brown, but often metallic blue or green. Most of the species are parasitoids of other insects, attacking the egg or larval stage of their host.

Ichneumonoidea  

The name is derived from Latin “ichneumon”, from Ancient Greek íkhnos (track, footstep). This superfamily of parasitoid wasps contains the two largest families within Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae and Braconidae.

Superfamilia Apoidea

Superfamilia Chalcidoidea

Superfamilia Ichneumonoidea

Superfamilia Chrysidoidea

Superfamilia Vespoidea

Subordo

Symphyta


From ancient Greek Sín = together + phyo = grow


Larvae look like caterpillars

Symphyta

In English they are called Sawflies, from the saw-like appearance of the ovipositor, but Symphyta are a sub-order of Hymenoptera. The adults have no sting and lack a"wasp waist”. Larvae look like bright coloured caterpillars.

Camponotus vagus

Crematogaster scutellaris

Formica rufa

Formica subsericea

Lasius flavus

Tetramorium caespitum



Eumenes

Polistes canadensis

Polistes gallicus

Polistes dominulus

Polistes Nimphus

Vespa crabro

Vespula germanica

Polistes rothneyi

Megascolia maculata


Sphaerophthalma

Anoplius nigerrimus


Arge pagana

Arge rosae

Argidae

Cimbicidae

Rhogogaster viridis

Tenthredinidae

Tenthredo celtica

Tenthredo moniliata



Ophion


Vespidae

Each social wasp colony includes a queen and a number of female workers. In temperate social species, colonies usually last only one year, dying at the onset of winter. The queens hibernate over winter in cracks or other sheltered locations.

Pompilidae

Their common name velvet ant refers to their dense pile of hair, bright scarlet. orange, black, white, silver, or gold. Their warning coloration is an aposematic signal, that’s to say they are not worth attacking or eating.